THE TEAM

Andrew Collins     

     Everett Hoskins

THE TEAM

Andrew Collins was born in Coventry, then moved to Malta as a baby. He grew up there and also Germany and Wales before finally settling back in England in 1981. 

He developed a fascination for photography when his father gave him a second hand Olympus camera at the age of 11. The love of image capture was thus born, but didn’t start to bear fruit until he became a freelance photographer in his early 20s. His first ever press submission ended up as a front cover on his local paper for a princely sum of £10. 

As a press photographer with a keen eye for the subject, he went on to have pictures published in The Times, The Observer and Big Issue North. He also did a stint as assistant photographer at Christie’s auction house, London, using one of first large format digital cameras in the world. That expertise translated into helping to create and produce Christie’s sales catalogues, plus invaluable experience of working in high end studios and environments. 

Around this period, Andrew discovered the Super-8 format (rather late in the day!), and a love for film. Making up his mind that he wanted to meet directors and writers, he co-founded a genre fanzine, frequented the often outrageous Scala cinema film festivals, pestered the Institute of Contemporary Arts, and made his presence felt at many of the key London media offices. Perseverance paid off, and it wasn’t long before he was achieving interviews, press screenings, occasional bit-parts and various tête-à-têtes with directors, actors, writers, and producers from the film industry. 

Monty Python helped him learn 16mm camera and editing techniques at their Panico Pictures studio, and he claims he did the second best short of his group – the first being one by Amy Gilliam, Terry’s daughter. Subsequently he worked on Royal College of Arts graduate shoots, music videos, and Channel 4 shorts, including the award winning Scary Movies. 

With changing technologies and following a move to Brighton, Andrew’s focus turned to getting to grips with the latest digital production formats. During this period he helped at the inception of TV Brighton, joined the local ITV organization as a cameraman, and then moved to other independent news services after the local ITV office was axed. He also set up a small, dynamic, independent video business, covering promos, news events and politics, getting access to exclusive interviews at the numerous party conferences held across Brighton’s conference calendar. He received recognition from numerous political offices for ensuring that all parties, regardless of viewpoint, obtained equal air time and fair play. His reputation for ensuring an unbiased impartiality in his interviews, was commensurate with the high standards of professional journalism that was prevalent at that time. 

Although always busy with journalistic, video, and film projects, Andrew also managed to find the time to add the role of theatre reviewer and film critic to his list of accomplishments. Andrew is a principal founder and director of Empathic Productions. His principal technical responsibility is creative writing, organising location shoots for clients, directing, editing, and video post-production services.

 

Andrew Collins was born in Coventry, then moved to Malta as a baby. He grew up there and also Germany and Wales before finally settling back in England in 1981. 

He developed a fascination for photography when his father gave him a second hand Olympus camera at the age of 11. The love of image capture was thus born, but didn’t start to bear fruit until he became a freelance photographer in his early 20s. His first ever press submission ended up as a front cover on his local paper for a princely sum of £10. 

As a press photographer with a keen eye for the subject, he went on to have pictures published in The Times, The Observer and Big Issue North. He also did a stint as assistant photographer at Christie’s auction house, London, using one of first large format digital cameras in the world. That expertise translated into helping to create and produce Christie’s sales catalogues, plus invaluable experience of working in high end studios and environments. 

Around this period, Andrew discovered the Super-8 format (rather late in the day!), and a love for film. Making up his mind that he wanted to meet directors and writers, he co-founded a genre fanzine, frequented the often outrageous Scala cinema film festivals, pestered the Institute of Contemporary Arts, and made his presence felt at many of the key London media offices. Perseverance paid off, and it wasn’t long before he was achieving interviews, press screenings, occasional bit-parts and various tête-à-têtes with directors, actors, writers, and producers from the film industry. 

Monty Python helped him learn 16mm camera and editing techniques at their Panico Pictures studio, and he claims he did the second best short of his group – the first being one by Amy Gilliam, Terry’s daughter. Subsequently he worked on Royal College of Arts graduate shoots, music videos, and Channel 4 shorts, including the award winning Scary Movies. 

With changing technologies and following a move to Brighton, Andrew’s focus turned to getting to grips with the latest digital production formats. During this period he helped at the inception of TV Brighton, joined the local ITV organization as a cameraman, and then moved to other independent news services after the local ITV office was axed. He also set up a small, dynamic, independent video business, covering promos, news events and politics, getting access to exclusive interviews at the numerous party conferences held across Brighton’s conference calendar. He received recognition from numerous political offices for ensuring that all parties, regardless of viewpoint, obtained equal air time and fair play. His reputation for ensuring an unbiased impartiality in his interviews, was commensurate with the high standards of professional journalism that was prevalent at that time. 

Although always busy with journalistic, video, and film projects, Andrew also managed to find the time to add the role of theatre reviewer and film critic to his list of accomplishments. Andrew is a principal founder and director of Empathic Productions. His principal technical responsibility is creative writing, organising location shoots for clients, directing, editing, and video post-production services.

Everett Hoskins was born in Glasgow then moved to Kent where he was educated in the Sevenoaks area.

He took classical piano lessons at the age of eight until around thirteen years old when he began to take a keen interest in the current pop music scene of the 1960’s. He began to play piano by ear while attending the local Saturday night youth club which had an old honky-tonk piano near the entry door. In his teens he played keyboard in several school bands, one of which was a semi-pro band, playing in London and the South East.

In the late 1960’s, Everett began hanging around Tangerine Studios, Dalston, East London. Everett had two friends working as engineers on its Studer 8 track and Alice mixing console. It was there that he cut his teeth on the rudiments of analogue recording and microphone placement techniques. It acted as a boot camp in sound engineering. When he wasn’t recording he was writing songs and playing with various musical arrangements on the studio Steinway.

In 1970, Everett went to teacher training college in Putney and in 1973, began teaching maths at a secondary school in the Tonbridge area. However, a chance meeting with a college friend during his first teaching year led to him attending an audition with Narnia, an Essex based rock band, who were looking for a replacement keyboard player. Deciding that he preferred being part of the 1970’s professional music scene, Everett left teaching and became a rock musician. For the next five years he worked and met with many of the leading musicians in the UK music industry.

In 1980, Everett left the music scene and entered the UK electronics industry as a sales engineer. He had been dabbling with building TVs, radios, light dimmers, electronic ignition systems since the age of thirteen. His career in the electronics industry led to him relocating to the USA around 1992, where he moved up the management ladder in the American semiconductor and telecoms industries, eventually becoming VP Sales and Marketing in a fast-growth semiconductor test services start up in Austin, TX. Everett specialised in semiconductor integrated circuits used in the audio industry, specifically Burr-Brown ADC and DAC integrated circuits, as well as low noise instrumentation and analogue audio amplifier applications.

In 1997, Everett worked briefly as a business development and marketing consultant with Jovian Music Technologies which developed the first Windows-based hard-drive streaming product for the professional keyboard sampling market. Up until that time digital sampling had been based on proprietary hardware rather than desktop computers. Jovian eventually produced the Gigasampler and Gigastudio range of software products for the PC. The first Windows-based, multi-sampled piano library, the Gigapiano, was born from a concept Everett put forward to the owner of the business. It is ironic that many years earlier, Everett had witnessed Tony Rockliff, https://tonyrockliff.com/about-tony the principal engineer at Tangerine Studios, create the first drum and base tape loop for a new single, whereby empty tape spools mounted on cabinets served to guide and transport the tape. Tony spliced the tape into a giant loop, and the makeshift transport system on the cabinets guided the loop continuously through the tape heads on the recorder.

In 2000, Everett relocated to the East coast of the USA to join Lucent Technologies Inc. He was employed as a strategic business development executive in Lucent’s Internetworking Services division, with sales responsibilities for the European and Middle Eastern switching products business. He later worked in Lucent’s terabit core router products group in Westford, MA.

In 2004, Everett designed and built one of the most advanced, (for its time), digital music recording studios in New Hampshire. This included renovating the ground floor, and designing the acoustics and isolation booths built into the basement area of his home. In the studio he set up a host of recording equipment and keyboards collected over the years including a Yamaha CP80 electric grand piano used by Elton John on a UK tour. The studio was used for several projects, including producing material for several local artists and vocalists.

In 2014, after 22 years in the USA, Everett relocated back to the UK, in Sevenoaks and turned to researching and developing several of the product ideas he brought back with him. While assisting with the marketing launch of a book for Willow Leaf Publishing, a Tunbridge Wells based publisher, he met Andrew Collins. That meeting eventually led to them forming Empathic Productions.

Everett’s technical design expertise has now segued into developing open-source, infra-red motion capture systems, principally to create a digital character modeling capability in 2D and 3D computer animation, but also to market turnkey systems to the independent film business. He is also writing a 1970’s era spy thriller.

Everett is a principal founder and director of Empathic Productions. His principal technical responsibility is sound design, location recording, ambisonics multi-channel recording, spectral audio forensics / analysis, post production services and acoustics.

Everett Hoskins was born in Glasgow then moved to Kent where he was educated in the Sevenoaks area.

He took classical piano lessons at the age of eight until around thirteen years old when he began to take a keen interest in the current pop music scene of the 1960’s. He began to play piano by ear while attending the local Saturday night youth club which had an old honky-tonk piano near the entry door. In his teens he played keyboard in several school bands, one of which was a semi-pro band, playing in London and the South East.

In the late 1960’s, Everett began hanging around Tangerine Studios, Dalston, East London. Everett had two friends working as engineers on its Studer 8 track and Alice mixing console. It was there that he cut his teeth on the rudiments of analogue recording and microphone placement techniques. It acted as a boot camp in sound engineering. When he wasn’t recording he was writing songs and playing with various musical arrangements on the studio Steinway.

In 1970, Everett went to teacher training college in Putney and in 1973, began teaching maths at a secondary school in the Tonbridge area. However, a chance meeting with a college friend during his first teaching year led to him attending an audition with Narnia, an Essex based rock band, who were looking for a replacement keyboard player. Deciding that he preferred being part of the 1970’s professional music scene, Everett left teaching and became a rock musician. For the next five years he worked and met with many of the leading musicians in the UK music industry.

In 1980, Everett left the music scene and entered the UK electronics industry as a sales engineer. He had been dabbling with building TVs, radios, light dimmers, electronic ignition systems since the age of thirteen. His career in the electronics industry led to him relocating to the USA around 1992, where he moved up the management ladder in the American semiconductor and telecoms industries, eventually becoming VP Sales and Marketing in a fast-growth semiconductor test services start up in Austin, TX. Everett specialised in semiconductor integrated circuits used in the audio industry, specifically Burr-Brown ADC and DAC integrated circuits, as well as low noise instrumentation and analogue audio amplifier applications.

In 1997, Everett worked briefly as a business development and marketing consultant with Jovian Music Technologies which developed the first Windows-based hard-drive streaming product for the professional keyboard sampling market. Up until that time digital sampling had been based on proprietary hardware rather than desktop computers. Jovian eventually produced the Gigasampler and Gigastudio range of software products for the PC. The first Windows-based, multi-sampled piano library, the Gigapiano, was born from a concept Everett put forward to the owner of the business. It is ironic that many years earlier, Everett had witnessed Tony Rockliff, https://tonyrockliff.com/about-tony the principal engineer at Tangerine Studios, create the first drum and base tape loop for a new single, whereby empty tape spools mounted on cabinets served to guide and transport the tape. Tony spliced the tape into a giant loop, and the makeshift transport system on the cabinets guided the loop continuously through the tape heads on the recorder.

In 2000, Everett relocated to the East coast of the USA to join Lucent Technologies Inc. He was employed as a strategic business development executive in Lucent’s Internetworking Services division, with sales responsibilities for the European and Middle Eastern switching products business. He later worked in Lucent’s terabit core router products group in Westford, MA.

In 2004, Everett designed and built one of the most advanced, (for its time), digital music recording studios in New Hampshire. This included renovating the ground floor, and designing the acoustics and isolation booths built into the basement area of his home. In the studio he set up a host of recording equipment and keyboards collected over the years including a Yamaha CP80 electric grand piano used by Elton John on a UK tour. The studio was used for several projects, including producing material for several local artists and vocalists.

In 2014, after 22 years in the USA, Everett relocated back to the UK, in Sevenoaks and turned to researching and developing several of the product ideas he brought back with him. While assisting with the marketing launch of a book for Willow Leaf Publishing, a Tunbridge Wells based publisher, he met Andrew Collins. That meeting eventually led to them forming Empathic Productions.

Everett’s technical design expertise has now segued into developing open-source, infra-red motion capture systems, principally to create a digital character modeling capability in 2D and 3D computer animation, but also to market turnkey systems to the independent film business. He is also writing a 1970’s era spy thriller.

Everett is a principal founder and director of Empathic Productions. His principal technical responsibility is sound design, location recording, ambisonics multi-channel recording, spectral audio forensics / analysis, post production services and acoustics.

And last but not least, the other Empathic Productions’ helpers, whose expertise and assistance have been invaluable. Check out their links below.

Anna-Marie Buss – Artist and award-winning graphics designer
Tom Bartlett – Sound recordist and engineer
Dan Talbot – Film, VFC, Photography and Blacksmithing
Anita Reid – Publisher
Theo Shaw – Lighting cameraman
Steve Perry – Business Consultant – Blue Elephant Marketing
Paul Chapman 
– Printing – Signal UK Ltd.
Rob Taylor 
– Animation (email)
MrWizzyWiz 
– Empathic Productions’ IT guru